1080 Keewatin St,
Thunder Bay, ON, P7B 6T7

Discover a selection of hand-made objects from our Permanent Collection. Many created with natural materials that can be found outside the Gallery.

Unidentified Artist Rogan, circa 1980 Birch bark, spruce root, hide 21.6 x 33.1 x 24 cm From Our Hands Collection, Gift of the Government of Canada, 1985.

Unidentified Artist Rogan, circa 1980 Birch bark, spruce root, hide 21.6 x 33.1 x 24 cm From Our Hands Collection, Gift of the Government of Canada, 1985.

Birch bark, also known as wiigwaas in Ojibwe, is one of the most important resources used in Indigenous cultures of the Great Lakes region. Birch bark baskets come in all shapes and sizes and were used for daily activities such as storage, gathering berries and hauling water (birch bark is waterproof which is why it makes great canoes). Design and decoration are integral to baskets, with the smoother, golden brown “inside” of the bark often used on the outside of the piece. Late June and early July is typically the time to harvest birch bark, and must be done with care and respect. If done correctly, gathering bark will not cause permanent damage to the tree. Many artists today are continuing this practice.

Glenn Small Tamarack Decoy, circa 1980 tamarack, nylon 30.5 x 51 x 27.5 cm From Our Hands Collection, Gift of the Ontario Government, 1985.

Glenn Small Tamarack Decoy, circa 1980 tamarack, nylon 30.5 x 51 x 27.5 cm From Our Hands Collection, Gift of the Ontario Government, 1985.

The forest near the gallery is filled with Tamarack trees. In Cree heritage, Tamarack decoys are based on lures that were used originally for goose-hunting. A Tamarack Decoy as a souvenir, or art piece, started in 1965 when a Cree man named John Bluejoy began to create small geese sculptures while recovering in the Moose Factory hospital. Today, artists from Moosonee and the James Bay region are renowned for their skill in binding delicate and fragrant tamarack twigs into the likeness of the Canada goose.

Isabel Rorick, Spruce Root Hat, nd, spruce root, 30 x 38 cm, Gift of Charles Peacock, 1992.

Isabel Rorick, Spruce Root Hat, nd, spruce root, 30 x 38 cm, Gift of Charles Peacock, 1992.

Stop and bend down near a tree root. Did you know spruce roots are used for weaving? Isabel Rorick (b. 1955) is an internationally renowned spruce root weaver born in Old Masset, Haida Gwaii. “I love going into the forest,” she says, “just talking about it makes me excited. Digging the roots… finding a good spot…”. Rorick prepares roots for weaving through a process of cooking and roasting passed down through generations. She weaves all her hats free form, without a set pattern.

Maime Migwans, Strawberry Basket, c1980, black ash, dye, 5.1 cm diameter, From Our Hands Collection, Gift of the Ontario Government, 1985.

Maime Migwans, Strawberry Basket, c1980, black ash, dye, 5.1 cm diameter, From Our Hands Collection, Gift of the Ontario Government, 1985.

Did you spot our wild strawberry patch? A weaver named Maime Migwans (b. 1925-2000) made this exceptionally sweet berry-shaped basket by delicately curling strips of Black ash. Black ash trees are generally found only along stream banks and the edges of swamps.

Known as Ode’imin or “heart berry,” the wild strawberry is an important plant in Anishinaabe culture. Bursting with flavour, nutrients (vitamin C), and medicinal uses, this hearty little plant was a key source of food and medicine for Indigenous people throughout history. Wild strawberries remain sacred and a source of inspiration for many people today. The plant is a common motif in traditional and contemporary beadwork, quillwork and basketry. The inviting red berries, white flower, and three leaflets appear in art and design throughout North America/Turtle Island.

Benjamin Chee Chee, Untitled [Family in Flight], 1977, acrylic on paper, 45.7 x 60.7 cm, The Bert Curtis Benjamin Chee Chee Collection, Purchased in 1983.

Benjamin Chee Chee, Untitled [Family in Flight], 1977, acrylic on paper, 45.7 x 60.7 cm, The Bert Curtis Benjamin Chee Chee Collection, Purchased in 1983.

Ojibwe Artist Benjamin Chee Chee (b. 1944-1977) is famous for his paintings of Canada geese. His minimalist portraits of the birds are graceful and dynamic. This piece expresses ideas of kinship and captures how geese move through the sky, from north to south and back again.

Ahmoo Angeconeb, Trout, sturgeon and Whitefish, 1986, linocut on paper (7/30), 42.5 x 26.5 cm, Gift of L. Bruce Pierce, Norflex Limited, 1994.

Ahmoo Angeconeb, Trout, sturgeon and Whitefish, 1986, linocut on paper (7/30), 42.5 x 26.5 cm, Gift of L. Bruce Pierce, Norflex Limited, 1994.

 

Artist Ahmoo Angeconeb (b. 1955-2017) depicts three different species of fish that live in the MacKenzie River Watershed, which includes the Neebing/McIntyre Floodway. In 2015, a stretch of the McIntyre River that flows near Central Ave underwent a restoration project to improve fish habitat. Riverbanks with diverse trees and plants help stop erosion and protect fish spawning areas. In this work, Ahmoo shows us how the mouth, eye and head a fish seem to define its “character.”

Francis Kagige Untitled (Deer Family), 1980 Acrylic on canvas board 46 x 61 cm Gift of Mr. N. C Opperman, 1988.

Francis Kagige
Untitled (Deer Family), 1980
Acrylic on canvas board
46 x 61 cm
Gift of Mr. N. C Opperman, 1988.

Deer are visitors to the gallery all year round. Francis Kagige (b. 1929-2014) captures the gentleness of these wild animals by depicting a doe rubbing noses with her fawn. If you wait long enough, a member of our own little deer family is likely to stop by the bird feeder at the back of the gallery. (Please do not approach the deer.)

Ahmoo Angeconeb, Man From the CaribouTotem Box, 1995, steel, 234 x 113.5 cm, Thunder Bay Art Gallery Collection, 1995.

Ahmoo Angeconeb, Man From the CaribouTotem Box, 1995, steel, 234 x 113.5 cm, Thunder Bay Art Gallery Collection, 1995.

Ahmoo Angeconeb, Man From the CaribouTotem, 1995, steel, 234 x 113.5 cm, Thunder Bay Art Gallery Collection, 1995.

Ahmoo Angeconeb, Man From the CaribouTotem, 1995, steel, 234 x 113.5 cm, Thunder Bay Art Gallery Collection, 1995.

Ahmoo Angeconeb’s (b. 1955-2017) iconic sculptures trick the eye as they greet our visitors. Ahmoo was such a skilled printmaker and sculptor that these works look like they are paper cut outs. Throughout his prolific career, Ahmoo explored Anishinaabe cosmologies with detailed lines and a wide range of colours and imagery. Including this 1995 commission, the gallery has 43 works by the artist our Permanent Collection. As an artist who began his relationship with the gallery in the 80s, we hold a special place for Ahmoo in our hearts.

Mary Anne Barkhouse, Wolf, 1999, bronze, 38 x 97 x 66 cm,Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program/Oeuvre achetée avec l'aide du programme d'aide aux acquisitions du Conseil des arts du Canada and funding from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, 2000.

Mary Anne Barkhouse, Wolf, 1999, bronze, 38 x 97 x 66 cm,Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program/Oeuvre achetée avec l’aide du programme d’aide aux acquisitions du Conseil des arts du Canada and funding from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, 2000.

Mary Anne Barkhouse, Wolf, 1999, bronze, 114 x 77 x 78 cm,Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program/Oeuvre achetée avec l'aide du programme d'aide aux acquisitions du Conseil des arts du Canada and funding from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, 2000.

Mary Anne Barkhouse, Wolf, 1999, bronze, 114 x 77 x 78 cm,Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program/Oeuvre achetée avec l’aide du programme d’aide aux acquisitions du Conseil des arts du Canada and funding from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, 2000.

Mary Anne Barkhouse, Wolf, 1999, bronze, 105 x 70 x 60 cm,Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program/Oeuvre achetée avec l'aide du programme d'aide aux acquisitions du Conseil des arts du Canada and funding from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, 2000.

Mary Anne Barkhouse, Wolf, 1999, bronze, 105 x 70 x 60 cm,Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program/Oeuvre achetée avec l’aide du programme d’aide aux acquisitions du Conseil des arts du Canada and funding from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, 2000.

Three bronze sculptures each titled “Wolf” are nestled in the forest that surrounds the Gallery. Completed in 2000, by sculptor Mary Anne Barkhouse (b. 1961). Each wolf’s canine body language and facial expressions are wise, wary, and dignified. These works are a beautiful reminder that the land is a shared home for many different species. Did you spot all three?

Fireline, 2000, Michael Belmore Copper, aluminum 288 x 460 cm Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program/ Oeuvre achetée avec l'aide du programme d'aide aux acquisitions du Conseil des arts du Canada and funding from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, 2000.

Fireline, 2000
Michael Belmore
Copper, aluminum
288 x 460 cm
Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program/ Oeuvre achetée avec l’aide du programme d’aide aux acquisitions du Conseil des arts du Canada and funding from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, 2000.

Michael Belmore’s Fireline is installed on the wall of the building just above the picnic table. Three main elements of this copper-toned piece create a layered vista. On the left, the artist’s precise metalwork suggests both twigs and forest shadows or a shoreline with lily pads. As the eye moves right across the linear plane, the imagery morphs into an upside-down treeline. A soaring bird connects these two landscapes. What do you a shifting, textured horizon represents in Fireline?